Notes on Nokia 6: Solid Device for Price-Conscious Android Photographers

While Google Pixel 2 and Samsung Galaxy $NUMBER are equipped with the best cameras, their sky-high prices can be hard to stomach. Fortunately, there are alternatives for those of us who don’t want to upset their wallets. Nokia 6 (TA-1021) is a case in point. Despite its ~€200 price sticker, Nokia 6 is a capable Android device with a decent camera to boot.

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Little Backup Box: Now with Geocorrelating Powers

Although the current version of Little Backup Box does the job, I still keep tweaking and improving it. And the latest version of the script brings a few minor but useful improvements. First of all, the script now shuts down the Raspberry Pi if no backup storage device or card is detected within a specified period of time. The default timeout is five minutes, but you can adjust it by changing the value of the SHUTD variable in the script.

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digiKam Recipes 18-01-25 Released

After a somewhat prolonged hiatus  (my move from Denmark to Germany  and full-time job at SUSE Linux GmbH had something to do with this), a new revision of the digiKam Recipes book is ready for your reading pleasure.

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Instant Photo Backup with Android

Many cameras have Wi-Fi capabilities, which in theory makes it easier to transfer photos to your mobile device for safe-keeping and sharing. In practice, though, downloading photos over Wi-Fi is just too slow to be of much practical use beyond occasionally grabbing a photo or two from your camera. Moreover, not all cameras allow you to transfer raw files, limiting the usefulness of the Wi-Fi feature even further. But if you happen to use an Android device that supports USB OTG (On-The-Go), an inexpensive and tiny adapter provides a neat solution to the problem.

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olympus-photosync: Wireless Bridge Between Olympus Cameras and Linux

Although modern Olympus cameras are not particularly hacker-friendly, enterprising and determined coders still manage to extend the existing functionality beyond its intended use. Case in point: olympus-photosync, a handy little tool that makes it possible to wirelessly transfer JPEG and raw files from a supported Olympus camera to a Linux machine (or Windows and macOS X for that matter).

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Little Backup Box Update and FAQ

I’ve been traveling quite a bit lately. And to fight the battery anxiety syndrome, I’ve bought an Anker PowerCore 20100 mAh power bank. This relatively compact and light pack features two USB charging ports capable of delivering up to 2.4 mAh.

Now that I have plenty of power when I’m on the move, I no longer need to rely on Raspberry Pi Zero to run the Little Backup Box script. So I upgraded my mobile photo backup box to Raspberry Pi 3.

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Compare Photos with ImageMagick and a KDE Service Menu Action

Need to compare two photos side-by-side? Using the convert tool, you can quickly stitch two or more photos together and compare the result in any image viewer:

convert photo1.jpg photo2.jpg +append compare.jpg

The example command above stitches photo1.jpg and photo2.jpg from left to right (i.e. photo1.jpg + photo2.jpg), but you can use -append instead of +append to reverse the order (i.e. photo2.jpg + photo1.jpg). In both cases, the stitched image is saved under the compare.jpg name.

If you use KDE as your preferred graphical desktop environment, you can create a context action to stitch file pairs in the Dolphin file manager. Create a text file and paste the following code into it:

[Desktop Entry]
Type=Service
ServiceTypes=KonqPopupMenu/Plugin
MimeType=image/JPG;image/JPEG;image/jpeg;image/JPG;image/jpg;
Actions=Compare
[Desktop Action Compare]
Name=Compare Photos
Exec=convert %F +append compare.jpg
Icon=image-x-applix-graphics

Save the file under the compare.desktop name and move it to /usr/share/kservices5/ServiceMenus:

sudo cp compare.desktop /usr/share/kservices5/ServiceMenus/

Open Dolphin, select a pair of JPEG files you want to compare, right-click on the selection, and choose the Actions → Compare Photos action to resize the image. This generates a compare.jpg file with the selected photos side by side. You can then use your preferred image viewer to examine the photos.

This is an excerpt from the Linux Photography book. Get your copy here.

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Recipes for automated and streamlined photographic workflow on Linux

Use digiKam? Get this book!

Practical advice for nighttime photography

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