Apply Multiple Hald CLUT Presets in a Single Action with a Bash Shell Script

Hald CLUT files offer a straightforward way to apply color corrections to an image (read the Linux Photography book to learn more about Hald CLUT and its usage). Install ImageMagick on your system, and you can easily apply a Hald CLUT preset to an image file using the following command:

convert foo.JPG hald-9.png -hald-clut foo-modified.jpeg

But what if you have a handful of Hald CLUT files and you want to apply them all to a specific photo?

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WD My Passport Wireless Linux Hacks

While WD My Passport Wireless is a rather useful device in its own right, the fact that it powered by a lightweight yet complete Linux distribution means that its capabilities can be extended even further. Deploy, for example, rclone on the device, and you can back up the photos and raw files stored on the disk to any supported cloud storage service.

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Sonnenhut: a Script to Run before a Photo Walk

Before you head for a photo walk, it makes sense to check the weather and ensure that you won’t miss the golden hour. And Sonnenhut can help you with that. This simple Python script fetches and displays current weather conditions and golden hour info for a specified city. The script is available on GitHub under the GPLv3 license.

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Show Geotagged Photos on OpenStreetMap

Want to show on the map the place where you took a specific photo? Provided that the photo is geotagged, the simple function below will do the job:

if [ -x "$(command -v exiftool)" ] ; then
function show-on-osm(){
lat=`exiftool -n -p '$GPSlatitude' $1`
lon=`exiftool -n -p '$GPSlongitude' $1`
osm="http://www.openstreetmap.org/?mlat=$lat&mlon=$lon&zoom=18"
xdg-open $osm
}
fi

The function extracts latitude and longitude values from the photo’s EXIF metadata, creates an OpenStreetMap URL, and opens it in the default browser.

For the function to work, you need to install the ExifTool on your system. Add the function to the ~/.bashrc file, and use the show-on-osm foo.JPG command to show the photo you want on OpenStreetMap (replace foo.JPG with the actual name of the desired photo).

This is an excerpt from the Linux Photography book. Get your copy here.

Posted in Open Source, Photography, Software

Add Captions with Basic EXIF Data to Photos using ImageMagick

Adding a caption containing basic EXIF info such as aperture, shutter speed, and ISO to a photo can come in useful in many situations. And a simple Bash shell script automates this action. The script uses the ExifTool and ImageMagick tools to extract EXIF data from a specified image. It then adds a caption containing the extracted aperture, shutter speed, and ISO values to the image.

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Install and Run Pixeluvo on openSUSE

Lightweight and affordable, Pixeluvo is an excellent application for editing and retouching photos on Linux. Pixeluvo is not free, but it can be installed on Linux using the binary packages available on the project’s website. The RPM packages are built for Fedora, but with minor tweaking, you can make Pixeluvo run smoothly on openSUSE, too.

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Assemble Photos into a GIF Animation or a Slideshow with ImageMagick

Animated GIFs are not only good for sharing funny cat videos. They can also come in rather handy when you want to whip up a quick-and-dirty slideshow that can be viewed on any platform or create a timelapse animation from a sequence of images with a minimum of effort.

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Recipes for automated and streamlined photographic workflow on Linux

Use digiKam? Get this book!

Practical advice for nighttime photography

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